The following is a list of male Babsons who had 10 or more children and is based on The Babson Genealogy 1606-2017Descendants of Thomas and Isabel Babson by Alicia Crane Williams, FASG. The reference to generation and number are keyed to that genealogy.  (The genealogy continues to be available for sale here.)  The genealogy does not provide separate sketches for Babson women until the tenth generation. No Babson woman is listed with 10 or more children.

Large families were typical in those early generations.  Children would help around the farm or the household.  The high incidence of early childhood deaths was also common.

Roger Ward Babson, the founder and funder of the Babson Historical Association, recognized the essential role that the forebear of the Babson family in America played.  Isabel Babson, the first Babson in America, herself a mother of 9 children, was a midwife.  Roger established the Isabel Babson Memorial Library in Gloucester in her memory.  The Library has books and materials for expectant mothers and for mothers raising children.

Second Generation

JAMES BABSON (1622-1683) (#3) was born in Wookey Parish, Somersetshire, England. He married Elinor Hill and they had 10 children, apparently all of whom lived to maturity. 

James was the son of the first Babson in this country, Isabel Babson.  James was the first male Babson from England to permanently reside in America. He was the younger son of Isabel who with her older son, Richard, arrived in Salem in 1637, before relocating to Cape Ann. Following the grant of land given to Isabel in 1658, James started a cooperage, a barrel making operation, on the current site of the Babson Museum.  His barrels were filled with fish and shipped to England, the West Indies and other ports. 

James died in Gloucester.

Third Generation

JOHN BABSON (1660-1737) (#7), born and died in Gloucester, and married Dorcas Elwell. Their marriage was the first to be solemnized by a minister that was entered as such in the Gloucester town records.   They had 10 children, 5 of whom survived to adulthood.

John’s land purchase in 1695 led to the settlement at Sandy Point, now part of Rockport, Massachusetts.

RICHARD BABSON (1663-1737) (#8) was born in Gloucester and died in Falmouth, Maine.  He married Mary Dolliver and they had 11 children, 8 of whom reached adulthood.  He remarried upon the death of Mary.

Richard was described as a “seaman, tailor, fisherman and coaster”.  (A “coaster” is one who sails a shallow-hulled trading vessel.)

Fourth Generation

JOHN BABSON (1687-1742) (#12) was born and died in Gloucester. He was a coaster and a fisherman.  (A “coaster” is one who sails a shallow-hulled trading vessel.)

John married Hannah Hodgkins and they had 10 children.  The first four children were two sets of male twins, of which one twin in each set survived infancy.  Of the other 6 children,  5 survived to adulthood.

Fifth Generation

CAPT. JAMES BABSON (1717-1759) (#14) was born and died in Gloucester.  He was a mariner and master of the schooner, Industry, that traveled to/from Lisbon.

Capt. James married Hannah Smith.  They had 10 children, only 5 of whom survived to adulthood.  Hannah died two years after James, at which time only one  of their children was over the age of 15.

Sixth Generation

CAPT. WILLIAM BABSON (1749-1831) (#25) was born in Gloucester and died in Charlestown, Massachusetts.  He was a privateer during the American Revolutionary War and owned various schooners.

Capt. William married Anna/Nancy Rogers and they had 10 children, all of whom achieved adulthood.

CAPT. JOHN BABSON (1746-1825) (#31) was born in Gloucester and died on Mount Desert Island, Maine. He was a privateer during the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. He owned various schooners and brigs. 

Capt. John married Susannah Rogers.  They had 11 children, 10 of whom survived to adulthood and two of whom were lost at sea.  See Babson family members lost at sea.

ABRAHAM BABSON (1761-1839) (#37) was born in Gloucester.  He moved with his parents to Babson’s Ridge in Sedgwick (now Brooklin), Maine in 1789 and died there.  He served in the American Revolutionary War.

Abraham married Ruth Lufkin.  They had 14 children, more than any other male Babson descendant.  Of the 14 children, only one of them died in infancy and most of whom enjoyed relatively long lives.

Seventh Generation

JAMES BABSON (1773-1847) (#41) was born in Beverly, Massachusetts and died in Central Falls, Rhode Island. He was an ensign in a Rhode Island militia and was described in a census as a “cotton weaver”.

Lt. James had 5 children by his first wife, Betsey Burton.  Three of them survived to adulthood.  Betsey may have died from complications of childbirth.   Lt. James then married Thankful (maiden name unknown) and they had 7 children, all of whom survived to adulthood.

WILLIAM BABSON (1779-1848) (#44) was born and died in Gloucester.  He was part owner of a number of ships, in many cases with his father and with his two brothers.  He was part-owner of the brig Cadet with his brother, Edward, whose ship’s log was the subject of Strong Winds & Passing Clouds at the Cape Ann Museum. He owned a “mansion”, a store and other real estate in Gloucester.

William married Mary Griffin and they had 10 children, 3 of whom died in infancy.  After Mary’s death, William married Polly Edgar Littlehale, who may have died of complications of childbirth since she died 4 months after the birth of their son who died at birth . William married a third time to Sarah (Davis) Williams.  They had no children.

JOHN BABSON (1781-1825) (#45) was born in Gloucester and died in Wiscasset, Maine.  He served in the War of 1812.  He was the editor of a newspaper in Wiscasset, a merchant and a ship owner.

John married Abigail Hughes (Hues) and they had 12 children, 5 of whom died in infancy.  At John’s death in 1825, he left 6 minor children and one who was born posthumously.

CAPT. CHARLES BABSON (1777-1859) (#50) was born in Gloucester and died in North Carolina.

Capt. Charles was shipwrecked off the coast of North Carolina and never returned to New England. He was the first Babson to settle in North Carolina and is the ancestor of the dozens of Babsons who live in Columbus and Brunswick Counties in southeastern North Carolina. Twelve children are attributed to him.

Capt. Charles married Susanna Howell of Gloucester and they had 5 children, all of whom survived to adulthood.  He was apparently declared legally dead as he never returned to Gloucester from the sea.  He did marry again, however, to Smitha Kinney in North Carolina.  They had 3 children, one of whom died in infancy.  Capt. Charles had 3 more children attributed to his union with Smitha but they may be children of a different mother or they may be  his grandchildren by an unknown son.

See more on Capt. Charles

CAPT. JOSEPH BABSON (1777-1839) (#57) was born and died in Gloucester.  He was a merchant and sea captain.

Capt. Joseph married his first cousin, Mary Babson.  They had 10 children, all of whom survived infancy.

Eighth Generation

JAMES BABSON, JR. (1803-1870) (#73) was born in Pomfret, Connecticut and died in West Gloucester, Rhode Island.  He was a spinner.  (A “spinner” spins yarn to make cloth.)  James and his family moved several times in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

James married Almeda Greenleaf Slafter.  They had 12 children, 2 of whom died in infancy.

JOSEPH BABSON (1809-1878) (#101) was born in Gloucester and died in Rockport, Massachusetts.  He was a fisherman and stone cutter.

Joseph was married twice and had 13 children.  He and his first wife, Maria Woodbury, had 12 children, 3 of whom died in infancy.  After Maria’s death, he married Mary (McRea) McDonald.  She was 41 and Joseph was 65 when their daughter was born.

Tenth Generation

WADE WHITTON “WHIT” BABSON (1897-1976) (#235) was born in Ash, North Carolina and died in Whiteville, North Carolina.  He was a farmer.

Whit and his wife, Amanda Stella Smith, had 12 children, the first of whom died as an infant.

DAVID PRATT BABSON (1880-1957) (#237) was born in Ash, North Carolina and died in Laurinburg, North Carolina.  He worked in a sawmill and later in a cotton mill.  He had 12 children.

David married Cora Dell Smith, and they had two children, the older of whom died in infancy.  After Cora’s death, he married Bessie Ella Carlisle.  They had 10 children, all of whom survived to adulthood.  After the death of Bessie, he married Frances Ambrose (Smith) Evans.  She had had 7 children by her first husband.

Eleventh Generation

JAMES BRYANT BABSON (1910-1978) (#352) was born in Ash, North Carolina and died in Whiteville, North Carolina.  He served in World War II.  He was a farmer and later worked at the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He had 13 children.

James was married to Clovis Fontella Ward and they had 4 children.  Clovis died a month after the death of their fourth child.  James then married Magdoline/Madelin/Magelene Griffin and they had 9 children, one of whom died in infancy.

GEORGE SAMUEL “CARNIE DELL” BABSON (1903-1957) (#375) was born in Ash, North Carolina and died in Bladenboro, North Carolina. The U.S. Census lists Carnie Dell variously as a farmer and in the sawmill industry and in the textile business.

Carnie Dell married Lanta Elizabeth Anderson.  They had 12 children, 3 of whom died in infancy.  After Lanta’s death, he married Lillie Bell Russ. They had no children.

DALLAS SYLVESTER BABSON (1920-1994) (#381) was born in Branchville, South Carolina and died in Clifton Park, New York.  He was one of 12 children.

Dallas served in World War II from 1942-1946 and again in the Korean War.  He owned and operated Babson’s Auto Repair and Sales in Hudson Falls, New York.

Dallas married Pauline Josephine Skovira, who had also served in World War II in the China-Burma-India Theatre of Operations. They had 11 children, all of whom lived to adulthood.  Their second child, Dallas Sylvester Babson, Jr., had 10 children.  After Pauline’s death in 1986, he married Francine (Mead) Bolster. They had no children.

Twelfth Generation

DALLAS SYLVESTER BABSON, JR. (1948-1999) (#661) was born and died in Rutland, Vermont.  His line of Babsons was prolific. He is a direct descendant of Capt. Charles Babson, the first Babson in North Carolina.   Dallas’  great- grandfather had 8 children;  his grandfather had 12 children; and his father had 11 children.  Dallas Jr. then had 10 children of his own.

Dallas, Jr. served in the U.S. Air Force for 10 years, including time in Vietnam.  He was a sulfur burner operator and later, an instrument technician.

Dallas married Kathleen M. Seymour.  They had 10 children, 5 of whom were minors at his death.